Versions of Truth

It was a lazy Sunday afternoon. I had absolutely nothing to do. Only seldom does one get a change to say I had nothing to do and not be procrastinating something important. I thought of spending some time on Facebook. While scrolling through the page I saw this game “Which Mahabharata character are you?”. The game was simple, you are asked a few questions. Based on your answers the algorithm computes similarities between you and the characters in Mahabharata. While I waited for my result, I expected the result to be Arjuna or Karna, or considering my stout built, I would have even accepted Bheem. But what turned out really shocked me. I got SHAKUNI….. I am not a cunning, deceiving and deceitful person like Shakuni. I was not just disappointed but at some level, even felt offended. I wanted to protest, but where and to whom. This was just a stupid game on internet. Not wanting to waste the rest of my afternoon. I tried to remember all the stories from Mahabharata that my grandmother told me as a kid. I went off to sleep.

When I woke up, I felt as though I had new insight on Mahabharata and found a whole new perspective on Shakuni. May be the saying “Sleep over it!” does work after all.

Here is Shakuni’s story. Shakuni is no ordinary man. He was a prince from the land of Gandhar, son of King Subala and brother of Gandhari. According to folklore, rulers of Hastinapur attacked and conquered Gandhar. They imprisoned all the male members of the royal family. The prisoners were given only one grain of rice per person per day to eat. ‘Surrender or perish’ was the message from the invaders. One grain of rice was not enough to feed them all, but all the grains put together could be enough to feed one person. They decided that the individual they choose to donate their share of rice to must be strong, wise and most importantly capable to avenge the misery brought upon Gandhar. Unanimously they voted “Shakuni!!!” They gathered around Shakuni and hit him hard near his knee, this made Shakuni slightly limp for the rest of his life. But this was done as a permanent reminder to the sacrifice his fellow countrymen made for him and the revenge which he had to accomplish. To add to Shakuni’s misery, his beautiful sister Gandhari was married to blind prince of Histinapur Dhrutarashtra. This infuriated Shakuni. He vowed to erase the entire lineage of rulers of Hastinapur. We only remember Shakuni for his treacherous deeds in Mahabharata. Considering the injustice Shakuni was subjected to, his actions seem justified and at the end he was successful the bloodline of Hastinapur royals perished.

The quiet nap that I took brought back a few more stories to mind.

When the great war at Kurukshetra seemed inevitable, Lord Krishna visited Duryodhana to persuade him to not go ahead with the war. Lives of countless men and destiny of two mighty dynasties were at stake. But Duryodhana wouldn’t relent. Having exhausted all his faculties. Krishna said “Duryodhana, I shall share with you knowledge that no one other than me has ever known. I shall share with you the secrets of ‘Bhagwat Geeta’. In the divine light of Geeta you will forget your lust for war.” Duryodhana smiled slightly and replied “I beg you Krishna not to endow me with the knowledge of Bhagwat Geeta, for I know that it would make me a better person. But to be bad is my  Dharma. Let me have the privilege to live by it.”

Time and again in this epic, the supposedly bad characters have behaved good and the good characters have deviated to do bad things. Take the example of Yudhisthir, also known as Dharmaraj, and yet this is the same person who looses his kingdom, his wealth, his brothers and his wife at a game of dice. Now you would say they game was rigged and he would have lost the game of dice no matter what. But the fact is that the one who is glorified for self control, restraint and patience, is the one who is tempted and does not show restraint and bets over and over again in a game when clearly the luck just wasn’t on his side.

When the world shunned Karna, believing he was inferior because of his inferior class he was born in; It was Shakuni who recognized the strengths of Karna. Shakuni always advised Duryodhana to befriend Karna and others for the strengths they possess, regardless of their social class.

If you look at other stories from this epic, you see that no character can be clearly defined as good or bad. All the characters constitute a grey mix between black and white. So which version of story do you believe in. The version that your grandmother told you when you were kids. Where moralities of characters from the epic were confined to a binary system of heroes and villains. Stories in which heroes are good because you have been told that they are good regardless of there misdemeanor. Or the kind of version that I had realization of after the sound nap, where characters in the epic are not binary but complex and have multiple shades to their constitution.

You really haven’t understood the moral of the epic, if you still believe in rigid classification between good and bad, right and wrong. Truth is formed by the experiences one has over his lifetime. The beliefs and value system one grows with and develops over time. Truth is relative to the perspective of each individual. So the next time you tell a story don’t be disappointed if your assertions are refuted or challenged. Your story is your version of truth, yet not necessarily of your listeners.

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Versions of Truth

It was a lazy Sunday afternoon. I had absolutely nothing to do. Only seldom does one get a change to say I had nothing to do and not be procrastinating something important. I thought of spending some time on Facebook. While scrolling through the page I saw this game “Which Mahabharata character are you?”. The game was simple, you are asked a few questions. Based on your answers the algorithm computes similarities between you and the characters in Mahabharata. While I waited for my result, I expected the result to be Arjuna or Karna, or considering my stout built, I would have even accepted Bheem. But what turned out really shocked me. I got SHAKUNI….. I am not a cunning, deceiving and deceitful person like Shakuni. I was not just disappointed but at some level, even felt offended. I wanted to protest, but where and to whom. This was just a stupid game on internet. Not wanting to waste the rest of my afternoon. I tried to remember all the stories from Mahabharata that my grandmother told me as a kid. I went off to sleep.

When I woke up, I felt as though I had new insight on Mahabharata and found a whole new perspective on Shakuni. May be the saying “Sleep over it!” does work after all.

Here is Shakuni’s story. Shakuni is no ordinary man. He was a prince from the land of Gandhar, son of King Subala and brother of Gandhari. According to folklore, rulers of Hastinapur attacked and conquered Gandhar. They imprisoned all the male members of the royal family. The prisoners were given only one grain of rice per person per day to eat. ‘Surrender or perish’ was the message from the invaders. One grain of rice was not enough to feed them all, but all the grains put together could be enough to feed one person. They decided that the individual they choose to donate their share of rice to must be strong, wise and most importantly capable to avenge the misery brought upon Gandhar. Unanimously they voted “Shakuni!!!” They gathered around Shakuni and hit him hard near his knee, this made Shakuni slightly limp for the rest of his life. But this was done as a permanent reminder to the sacrifice his fellow countrymen made for him and the revenge which he had to accomplish. To add to Shakuni’s misery, his beautiful sister Gandhari was married to blind prince of Histinapur Dhrutarashtra. This infuriated Shakuni. He vowed to erase the entire lineage of rulers of Hastinapur. We only remember Shakuni for his treacherous deeds in Mahabharata. Considering the injustice Shakuni was subjected to, his actions seem justified and at the end he was successful the bloodline of Hastinapur royals perished.

The quiet nap that I took brought back a few more stories to mind.

When the great war at Kurukshetra seemed inevitable, Lord Krishna visited Duryodhana to persuade him to not go ahead with the war. Lives of countless men and destiny of two mighty dynasties were at stake. But Duryodhana wouldn’t relent. Having exhausted all his faculties. Krishna said “Duryodhana, I shall share with you knowledge that no one other than me has ever known. I shall share with you the secrets of ‘Bhagwat Geeta’. In the divine light of Geeta you will forget your lust for war.” Duryodhana smiled slightly and replied “I beg you Krishna not to endow me with the knowledge of Bhagwat Geeta, for I know that it would make me a better person. But to be bad is my  Dharma. Let me have the privilege to live by it.”

Time and again in this epic, the supposedly bad characters have behaved good and the good characters have deviated to do bad things. Take the example of Yudhisthir, also known as Dharmaraj, and yet this is the same person who looses his kingdom, his wealth, his brothers and his wife at a game of dice. Now you would say they game was rigged and he would have lost the game of dice no matter what. But the fact is that the one who is glorified for self control, restraint and patience, is the one who is tempted and does not show restraint and bets over and over again in a game when clearly the luck just wasn’t on his side.

When the world shunned Karna, believing he was inferior because of his inferior class he was born in; It was Shakuni who recognized the strengths of Karna. Shakuni always advised Duryodhana to befriend Karna and others for the strengths they possess, regardless of their social class.

If you look at other stories from this epic, you see that no character can be clearly defined as good or bad. All the characters constitute a grey mix between black and white. So which version of story do you believe in. The version that your grandmother told you when you were kids. Where moralities of characters from the epic were confined to a binary system of heroes and villains. Stories in which heroes are good because you have been told that they are good regardless of there misdemeanor. Or the kind of version that I had realization of after the sound nap, where characters in the epic are not binary but complex and have multiple shades to their constitution.

You really haven’t understood the moral of the epic, if you still believe in rigid classification between good and bad, right and wrong. Truth is formed by the experiences one has over his lifetime. The beliefs and value system one grows with and develops over time. Truth is relative to the perspective of each individual. So the next time you tell a story don’t be disappointed if your assertions are refuted or challenged. Your story is your version of truth, yet not necessarily of your listeners.

Why I do it!!!

I remember the first time I attended Toastmaster session. When asked to introduced myself, I started with my work experience, my educational background and certifications I had completed. I paused for a second as I realized, that I was at a Toastmasters Club meeting, and not for a job interview. So I changed subjects to talk about why I was at the club and what I expected to get out of the club. I also talked about my hobbies. Cricket, music and mountains are my passion. Ever since that day, I have never missed a chance to get on stage and talk about mountains and my trekking experiences. And as I spoke, I have seen some eyebrows raised, doubting the credibility of my stories. I know it’s hard to believe a visibly unfit guy like me talk about mountaineering. So I thought to take this opportunity to substantiate my stories with photographic evidence.

So let me jump straight to my presentation, where I’ll show you photographs of three my favourite treks.

1. Alang – Kulang – Madan


Before I tell you about this trek, I want to ask everyone; Which was you most memorable New Year’s Eve? I am sure most would have stories of an epic party with friends at a bar or a pub, or may be a club. For me this particular trek stands out. My friends and I planned to do something different that year. So the moment someone of us muttered Alang – Kulang – Madan, we all agreed in unison. Alang- Kulang – Madan are three most isolate and remote forts in Maharashtra. Very few venture out to these forts, due to its sheer inaccessibility. We drove overnight to the base of the forts, then trekked through thick forests for good six to seven hours, with heavy sacks on our backs; only to face a huge rock wall smooth as a slate. With sun hurrying towards the horizon, we had to muster up as much strength as we could to anchor the ropes and climb the wall that stood before us. Our exhaustion was more than compensated for by the amazing view from the top. We setup a small camp fire and slept next to it gazing at millions of shimmering stars in the clear night sky. At the stroke of midnight the horizon on either side of the forts light up with fireworks set from the towns below.

2. Raigad


Raigad, the capital of the Maratha Empire. A perfect specimen of a formidable fortified fort. I have visited this fort many times, and each time the fort has surprised me with something new. By the way luck never seems to favor me when at this fort though. This one time, I broke my shoes and had to walk bare foot in the mountains on a hot summer afternoon. The other time I broke my toes and had to limp all through the trek. Most memorably, I remember, it rained so heavily that there was about three inches of water in our tent, I had to sleep sitting on our sack.

3. Vasota


Just like Alang, this fort too is one of the most remote places in Maharashtra. Fort Vasota is located in the back waters of the Koyna river. This fort marks the border of rain shadow region. Thick forest and large back waters of the Koyna river on one side and a complete barren landscape on the other side. One can clearly see the stark contrast between the two landscapes during summers. Due to its inaccessibility, Marathas used this fort as prison. Most dreaded convicts of their times were locked up here. Though this fort is heavily fortified, it has never been part of any famous battles. It exchanged hands only through treaties signed between kingdoms. Only story of a battle that I know was between Marathas and British. This too was a token fight, cause it is said that the British fired only three cannon balls at this fort and the fort was surrendered.

Today, I shared only a few of my experiences with you all. My wife hasn’t been this fortunate. One day when I told her about one of my trekking experiences; she shrugged her shoulders and said, “Trekking twenty miles, with a twenty pound sack on your back, all day under the sun in the mountains is not a definition of a fun activity.That’s manual labour. Why would you do such a thing?”. To answer her question I showed her this photo.

That’s me fast asleep on the floor of Satara Bus Depot after a long trek. But on a serious note  my answer to ‘Why do I do it?’ is for three main reasons.

1. Self Actualization


With each trek I have a new realization of my capabilities. Capabilities that I knew I had and the one I didnt. Like the capabilities, I also have the realization of my limitations. With each trek I challenge myself and discover how far I can physically and mentally push myself.

2. History

Every window has a different perspective. History is not dull and depressing as it is in our text books, and its definitely not as glamorous as shown in the movies. To really understand history you have to visit these forts and mountains. They give you a chance to visualize how things must have transpired in the past.

3. I am a Storyteller


I love to tell stories. The most vivid stories are only possible if you have had the opportunity to travel, explore, see and experience things first hand. With a large bag full of experiences that I have, make for some really exciting stories to tell.